Barak Kushner (バラク・クシュナー) (顧若鵬)

University of Cambridge, ケンブリッジ大学, 劍橋大學

Selected Works

Book
This book examines how factions of Nationalists and Communists within China structured the war crimes trials in ways meant to strengthen their competing claims to political rule. On the international stage, both China and Japan propagandized the tribunals, promoting or blocking them for their own advantage.
This is a book from a major Japanese newspaper looking out over the last eighty years of Japanese history and analyzing the role media plays in the formation of history. The work includes extensive company archival material and key interviews with journalists involved in critical moments of 20th century Japanese history from 1926-1989.
The first book in English to unravel the history of ramen, Japan's famous noodle soup.
The only English- language book that delves into the intricacies of WWII Japanese propaganda
Book chapter
A different look at empire and juvenile delinquency in the Far East.
Book Chapter
This research considers some of the ways in which sweets increasingly came to be incorporated into the everyday lives of Japanese people, as an indicator of rising levels of "modernity."
Overview of Japan's efforts to market and promote the 1940 Olympic games in Tokyo that never took place
An analysis of Japanese wartime kamishibai and the market for children's propaganda
Academic Journal Article
"Ghosts of the Japanese Imperial Army: The ‘White Group’ (Baituan) and Early Post-war Sino-Japanese Relations,” Past and Present, volume 218, suppl 8 (Transnationalism and Contemporary Global History), (2013), p. 117-150.
Article on John Provoo, Japan and the Cold War in the US
How history influences politics and culture in Taiwan, Japan and China
See my co-authored, award-winning article on Japanese wartime radio propaganda.
Article about Japanese media "hero" and crime
Catalogue
See my essay on Alan Marcuson's fantastic collection of imperial Japanese textiles.
Online Article
Brief Article
Download the article from the Cambridge University Research Magazine

Biography

Barak Kushner teaches modern Japanese history in the Faculty of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies (formerly the Faculty of Oriental Studies) at the University of Cambridge and has a PhD in History from Princeton University. He has written three books: Men to Devils, Devils to Men: Japanese War Crimes and Chinese Justice (Harvard University Press, 2015); Slurp! A culinary and social history of ramen - Japan's favorite noodle soup (Brill, 2012), awarded the 2013 Sophie Coe Prize for Food History, the longest-running and most generous prize for writing in food history in the English language; and The Thought War - Japanese Imperial Propaganda (Hawaii 2006). As a scholar he has written on wartime Japanese and Chinese propaganda, Japanese media, Sino-Japanese relations, humor, food history, BC class war crimes, and the Cold War. Currently, he is working on a monograph concerning postwar East Asian history, and a second volume about war crimes in East Asia, tentatively entitled The Construction of Justice in East Asia and the Search for Legitimacy.

He has just launched a 5-year European Research Council funded project, “The Dissolution of the Japanese Empire and the Struggle for Legitimacy in Postwar East Asia, 1945–1965.” This 5-year grant will examine the impact of the fall of the Japanese empire in East Asia. The project manages several postdoctoral research associates and offered two full scholarships to PhD students in an effort to investigate this important historical moment. In the summer of 2008 he was a visiting scholar at Nanjing University (China) and during 2009 he was a visiting scholar at Waseda University (Japan). Previously, Kushner worked in the US Department of State as a political officer in East Asian affairs and taught Chinese and Japanese history at Davidson College in North Carolina, USA.

Kushner’s latest monograh analyzes the postwar adjudication of Japanese war crimes in China and the legal aftermath. His second book examined food and history within Sino-Japan relations, centering on the popular ramen noodle dish. The ramen book has been the focus of numerous articles in the major Japanese presses, including interviews in the Asahi Shimbun (which featured a page-long piece), Yomiuri Shimbun, (including a mention on page one) Mainichi Shimbun, Sankei Shimbun, Tokyo Shimbun, Nikkei Business Weekly, and a variety of provincial newspapers. He has also appeared on the BBC radio show, In Our Time, to discuss the Sino-Japanese War or WWII in East Asia.

His academic articles have appeared in Past and Present, Journal of Contemporary History, Diplomatic History, The International History Review, Japanese Studies, Journal of Popular Culture, and the Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television. He has published numerous book chapters in edited volumes dealing with: a postwar media history of Godzilla, kamishibai and children's wartime propaganda in Japan, the Chinese influence on early 20th century notions of modern cuisine in Japan, Japan's 1940 Olympic plans, the image of Japan in Chinese humor, and other topics.

Dr. Kushner received his BA from Brandeis University and then began his career as a high school teacher of social studies in Chicago. Later, he traveled to Iwate, Japan where he taught English, lived in a Buddhist temple, and attended Japanese elementary school, studying Japanese along with other students ages 6-12. He lived in Japan for over 5 years in Tokyo, Yokohama and Iwate and studied at Rikkyo University and Tokyo University. After completing courses in advanced Japanese, Kushner was an editor/​ translator at the National Institute for Research Advancement, a think tank in Tokyo. He taught western history at Shenyang Teacher's University in the north of China where he also studied Chinese and began research in Chinese history. After returning to the United States he attended graduate school at Princeton University and received a PhD in history.

Dr. Kushner has been invited to speak about East Asian History at Florida State University (Tallahassee), William and Mary College (Program in Washington DC), the University of Hong Kong, University of Texas (Austin), University of Heidelberg, University of Sydney (Australia), Murdoch University (Perth, Australia), Aichi University (Japan), National Taiwan University, National Chengchi University (Taiwan), Tunghai University (Taiwan), Nanjing University (China), SOAS, the Royal College of Art in London, University of Bristol, the Max Planck Institute for Human Development (Berlin), University of Oxford, Tokyo University, Waseda University (Japan), the University of Alaska at Anchorage, Pennsylvania State University, Kansas University, Western Michigan University, Rowan University, Occidental College, George Washington University, Indiana State University, Hebrew University (Jerusalem), and the University of Oregon. He is on the editorial board of the journal, Modern Asian Studies, and also served as an historical consultant for the Japan Society in New York City. Barak has completed several academic translations on economics and military history from Japanese to English. He speaks and reads Japanese, Chinese, and French.

Kushner has obtained several grants and fellowships in the course of his research: a multi-year grant from the Toshiba Foundation to investigate the role of media in the formation of historical opinions, a 2012-2013 British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship, a 2012 and 2007 Japan Foundation Endowment Committee Grant; a 2010 British Academy Short Term Grant to Academia Sinica, Taiwan for a research project on the dissolution of the Japanese empire and during the same time he was part of a Taiwanese Ministry of Education Foreign Summer Grant sponsored international academic team exploring the project “Postwar Taiwanese History, 1950-1960.” In 2009 he participated in a Taiwanese Ministry of Education Foreign Summer Grant sponsored academic group which analyzed the theme, “Exploring the Cultural Faces of Taiwan 1945-1960.” In 2008 he was awarded an Abe Fellowship to conduct research (from 2008-2010) into the legal history of the early Cold War in East Asia. He used the award in both China and Japan. While teaching at Davidson College (2002-2005) he received support from three Freeman Foundation grants to conduct research in Japan, China, and Korea. In 2004 Dr. Kushner also received Freeman Foundation support to travel to Mongolia on an SIT-sponsored tour.