Barak Kushner (バラク・クシュナー) (顧若鵬)

University of Cambridge, ケンブリッジ大学, 劍橋大學

Selected Works

Co-edited Book
This volume brings together the latest in Japanese and Western scholarship on the turbulent years following the end of Japan’s empire in East Asia.
To discuss the rebuilding of Japan, the authors argue that it is first essential to critically examine Japan’s ‘Lost Decades’ and this book offers a comprehensive overview of Japan’s recent 20 years of crisis.
Book
This book examines how factions of Nationalists and Communists within China structured the war crimes trials in ways meant to strengthen their competing claims to political rule. On the international stage, both China and Japan propagandized the tribunals, promoting or blocking them for their own advantage.
The only English language book to delve solely into Japanese wartime propaganda history.
Translation
This is a book from a major Japanese newspaper looking out over the last eighty years of Japanese history and analyzing the role media plays in the formation of history. The work includes extensive company archival material and key interviews with journalists involved in critical moments of 20th century Japanese history from 1926-1989.
Book Chapter
This research considers some of the ways in which sweets increasingly came to be incorporated into the everyday lives of Japanese people, as an indicator of rising levels of "modernity."
Overview of Japan's efforts to market and promote the 1940 Olympic games in Tokyo that never took place
An analysis of Japanese wartime kamishibai and the market for children's propaganda
Book chapter
A different look at empire and juvenile delinquency in the Far East.
Academic Journal Article
"Ghosts of the Japanese Imperial Army: The ‘White Group’ (Baituan) and Early Post-war Sino-Japanese Relations,” Past and Present, volume 218, suppl 8 (Transnationalism and Contemporary Global History), (2013), p. 117-150.
Article on John Provoo, Japan and the Cold War in the US
How history influences politics and culture in Taiwan, Japan and China
See my co-authored, award-winning article on Japanese wartime radio propaganda.
Article about Japanese media "hero" and crime
Catalogue
See my essay on Alan Marcuson's fantastic collection of imperial Japanese textiles.
Online Article
Brief Article
Download the article from the Cambridge University Research Magazine

“Pawns of Empire: Postwar Taiwan, Japan and the Dilemma of War Crimes,” in Japanese Studies, (Special issue on Japan and Taiwan), Vol. 30, No. 1, May 2010, p. 111-133.

Examining the plight of the Taiwanese, who were pawns in the larger conflict of World War Two, helps us to understand the complicated process of the breakdown of the Japanese empire. The postwar legal adjudication of BC class Japanese war crimes in East Asia is a key element in unwinding the historical complexity of postwar power shifts, the formation of a Taiwanese identity, and its connection to Japan’s postwar foreign relations goals. This paper considers three inter-related issues – analyzing how Japanese rule was restructured in the postwar former colonies, dissecting the prosecution of lower-level Japanese war crimes, and resolving the conundrum of collaboration within the former empire. These problems are tied intimately together due to the transformation of postwar identity and colonial politics.

This article will also appear in a Routledge published volume of the same special issue, entitled "Statecraft and Spectacle in East Asia Studies in Taiwan-Japan Relations," in Adam Clulow, ed., Statecraft and Spectacle in East Asia (Studies in Taiwan-Japan Relations), London: Routledge, 2010, p. 108 -130.

Statecraft and Spectacle in East Asia is a multidisciplinary collection of essays that explores the intertwined histories of Taiwan and Japan across the long sweep of the early modern and modern periods. Drawing on new research by scholars from Europe, North America and Asia-Pacific, it moves beyond the conventional focus on the mechanics of the Japanese colonial state to provide new perspectives on a highly significant relationship that shaped the nature of the modern East Asian political landscape. Ranging from the seventeenth century to the chaotic aftermath of empire, the papers collected here consider Tokugawa Japan’s halting engagement with Taiwan as a key world historical moment that illuminates changing attitudes towards maritime expansion; the ways in which the colonial project was packaged and sold in print as well as image; and the complex legal discourses surrounding the making and unmaking of empire. Together they show how influence flowed both ways between Taiwan and Japan and the importance of inter-Asian interactions.